Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 15 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Elizabeth Goldman, Stan Chung, Lisa Miller, Svein Kvalo, Chester Hartman, Dinny Risri Aletheiani, Martin Nyachoti, Zephania Matanga, Charles Desmond, and Melinda Hollis Thomas.

McCollum, Pam (1998). Lessons Learned, Lessons Shared: Texas Immigrant Education Collaborative. This monograph shares the lessons learned from participation in the Intercultural Development Research Association's Texas Immigrant Education Collaborative (TIEC) project in two sites: a middle school in Houston with an international immigrant student population and a border high school in El Paso with a primarily homogenous Mexican immigrant population. Data came from field notes and interviews with students, teachers, parents, and administrators. Part 1 of the monograph is a primer on immigrant education that discusses related basic issues. Part 2 presents a broad discussion of the lessons learned from participation in the TIEC project. In part 3, selected TIEC initiatives are described with details about how each lesson was learned. In most cases, the teachers in program schools had good ideas about what they wanted to do to improve students' education. What they lacked was time to interact and a forum to build advocacy for immigrant students. Five appendixes contain information about immigrant students' rights to attend public schools, a list of organizations devoted to immigrant issues, lists of immigrant education and Internet resources, and a glossary of terms related to immigrant education. (Contains 2 tables, 2 figures, and 48 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: High Schools, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Middle Schools

Matanga, Zephania; Freeze, Rick; Duchesne, Hermann; Nyachoti, Martin (2008). Disability and Diversity in Canada: Problems and Opportunities in Creating Accessible and Inclusive Learning and Service Delivery Environments, Journal of the International Association of Special Education. A novel participatory workshop methodology was adopted in this qualitative study of the intersection of disability and diversity in the lives of individuals. Social service recipients, parents, educators, service providers, and policy makers in three Canadian cities were conjoined in daylong discussions designed to investigate if the realities of inclusion and access become more complex when individuals with disabilities also are recent refugees or economic immigrants of a visible ethno-cultural minority. The themes that emerged from the discussions focused on problems in the areas of appropriate educational provisions, access to work, access to services, marginalization, mental health, self-definition, human rights, and universal design. Opportunities for improved educational and social services are described in relation to the insights, observations, and recommendations of the workshop participants. The recommendations for improving the education and social service provisions to individuals with disability and diversity characteristics are related to: (a) adopting a more holistic approach to education and social service delivery, (b) extending educational inclusion, (c) strengthening home-school partnerships, (d) enhancing professional development, (e) expanding public education on disability and diversity issues, (f) developing better mental health services, and (g) augmenting employment supports.   [More]  Descriptors: Holistic Approach, Disabilities, Workshops, Foreign Countries

Palmer, Deborah K. (2009). Middle-Class English Speakers in a Two-Way Immersion Bilingual Classroom: "Everybody Should Be Listening to Jonathan Right Now…", TESOL Quarterly: A Journal for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and of Standard English as a Second Dialect. Two-way bilingual immersion education, offered in a fast-growing number of primary schools in the United States, provides primary language maintenance to minority language speakers while simultaneously offering an enrichment "foreign" language immersion experience to English-speaking children in the same classroom, generally with the same teacher. This fusion of two different groups of children, two different sets of expectations, is controversial: Is it possible to accomplish both goals at once, or will teacher and program inevitably end up serving the needs of dominant English-speaking children first? The equation is further complicated when the English speakers in a program come from mainly highly educated middle-class families, and the Spanish speakers come from mainly working-class immigrant families, as is the case in many of these programs. Drawing on audio and video data from a year-long study in a second-grade two-way classroom that shares this class gap between language groups, and using a methodology that fuses ethnography and discourse analysis, this article explores the ways English-speaking children can impact classroom conversational dynamics.   [More]  Descriptors: Language Maintenance, Language Minorities, Immersion Programs, Bilingual Education

Hayes, Noirin (2010). Childcare? Early Childhood Education and Care? Towards an Integrated Early Years Policy for Young Children in Ireland, Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development. The decade 1997 to 2007 was a dramatic one for Ireland. Driven by a strong economy it had low rates of unemployment and attracted a large population of immigrant workers. These changes impacted directly on family life–most particularly in the area of the education and care of young children. The recent and equally dramatic change in economic circumstances has provided an unexpected context for a significant policy shift in early childhood care and education (ECCE) which, if carefully managed, could have profound effects on young children and their families. This article considers what recent Irish ECCE policy tells us about views of children and childhoods and where Ireland stands in respect of early childhood provision; it identifies some distinctly Irish tensions and considers what the likelihood is that recent policy initiatives mark a significant move forward for those seeking high quality ECCE provision for young children.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Early Childhood Education, Child Care, Young Children

deMoraes, Beatriz B. (1997). What Is the Impact of English-Only and New Immigration Laws on Non-English Speaking Patients?. The annotated bibliography cites 21 articles and legal documents relating to the effects of English-only policies on the quality and availability of health care for immigrants and limited English-speakers. Article topics include eviction of illegal immigrants from nursing homes, health care for undocumented aliens, welfare reform and care for disabled illegal immigrants, state policy and language minority rights, English-only laws and access to information, availability of sign language and deaf interpretation, attitudes toward patient autonomy, health care and civil rights, poverty and health care, welfare reform, immigrant use of health care services, and managed care.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Annotated Bibliographies, Civil Rights, Disabilities

Chung, Stan (2016). The Morning after Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report: Decolonisation through Hybridity, Ambivalence and Alliance, Intercultural Education. In Canada, 2015 will be remembered for the publication of the "Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report" which related to all Canadians the impacts of the Indian residential school system. The Commission invokes the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and uses the term reconciliation as a national strategy for moving forward. This paper employs an autoethnographic methodology and proposes that reconciliation might benefit by finding ways of confronting the Other within; I describe my reflections on a trip to the 2015 conference "Learning at Intercultural Intersections" at Thompson Rivers University. My social and cultural experiences as a Korean Canadian academic and administrator are challenged in order to consciously shift my own colonising mindset. Reconciliation in Canada will require significant personal, professional, institutional and sociocultural inquiry. What does it mean to discover the Other within? How do we walk with Indigenous peoples? How do educators come to be called ally by Indigenous peoples?   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Indigenous Populations, Consciousness Raising, Multicultural Education

Raby, Rosalind Latiner; Miller, Lisa, Comp. (2003). Comparative and International Education: A Bibliography (2002), Comparative Education Review. Cites 1,424 articles on comparative and international education in 319 journals published 2002. Categories: adult, rural, vocational, literacy, lifelong, and popular education; child, citizenship, human rights; comparative; curriculum, instruction, assessment; educational planning, development, and reform; gender; general; higher education; indigenous education; intercultural, bilingual, multicultural; methodology, theory; minority, refugee, and immigrant education; policy analysis; primary education; secondary education; special education; study abroad; teacher education; technology; world regions. Descriptors: Comparative Education, Cross Cultural Studies, Educational Change, Educational Development

Kvalo, Svein (2008). Numeracy Activities within VOX: The Norwegian Institute for Adult Learning, Adult Learning. In this article, the author introduces Vox, Norwegian Institute for Adult Learning, an agency of the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research that focuses mainly on improving basic skills in the adult population in the areas of literacy, numeracy and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT). Vox is responsible for curriculum development in Norwegian language learning and socio-cultural orientation for adult immigrants, and cooperation with the other agencies which provide initial training for this group. Vox administers governmental funding directed towards educational non-governmental organizations, open and distance learning institutions, and finances pedagogical development in this field. It also finances educational projects aimed at improving basic skills in the adult population, and is considered an authority on the recognition and validation of non formal and informal learning and on the statutory rights of adults to basic education. The author discusses the Norwegian national initiative for funding basic adult numeracy research and shares internet resources addressing the need for instructional materials at the lowest numeracy levels. The author also discusses Vox's present goals and future directions.   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Literacy Education, Informal Education, Distance Education

Thomas, Melinda Hollis; Aletheiani, Dinny Risri; Carlson, David Lee; Ewbank, Ann Dutton (2014). "Keeping up the Good Fight": The Said and Unsaid in "Flores v. Arizona", Policy Futures in Education. The authors' purpose in this article is to interrogate the mediated and political discourses that emerged alongside the "Flores v. Arizona" case. The authors endeavor to offer another voice, framework and approach that may help sustain a continuous, paramount conversation concerning the educational rights of English language learners and the ways in which the public rationalizes appropriate state provisions for such students. Therein, the manuscript operationalizes the rationalities that appear across pro-"Flore"s data (which consists of public opinion rhetoric positioned in support of the plaintiff and therefore in favor of appropriate state support for English language learners). The analysis of this data lays bare the echoes of the discursive regime surrounding the "Flores" case, a regime which unmasks neo-liberal rationalities for supporting English language learners. For example, the findings indicate that neo-liberal rationalities such as commodification, competition, risk, security, insurance and entrepreneurialism dominate the discursive landscape and eclipse alternative ways of arguing in support of students' rights to equitable and appropriate education, including social justice, pluralism and democracy.   [More]  Descriptors: Court Litigation, English Language Learners, Student Rights, Access to Education

Multicultural Education, Training and Advocacy (META), Inc., San Francisco, CA. (1990). A Handbook for Immigrant Parents: Protect the Educational Rights of Your Children. This handbook for immigrant parents outlines the legal rights of immigrant children to educational services. All children in the United States have a right to attend school. Schools may require proof of residency and vaccination before enrollment, but a signed sworn statement attesting to the child's age may be substituted for a birth certificate. Some schools require immigrant children to be reviewed by an intake center before admission, but it is illegal for the information to be passed on to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). No high school student should be automatically placed in a freshman class without assessment of his educational background; misplacement of a limited-English-speaking student in a class for the mentally and physically disabled is a very serious problem. Children may be entitled to the following special services: (1) special education programs; (2) gifted and talented programs; (3) migrant education programs; and (4) compensatory education programs. A school district must meet special language needs. Bilingual education programs are special programs to develop English language skills and include instruction in the student's native language. These programs usually afford the best opportunity to learn English. Schools also have an obligation to provide parents with information in a language they can understand. Parents have a right to a formal hearing with a lawyer if their child is suspended or expelled. Parents also have a right to inspect and review their child's education records. A list of legislation guaranteeing immigrant childrens' rights is appended. Descriptors: Bilingual Education Programs, Educational Legislation, Elementary Secondary Education, Immigrants

Carrera, John Willshire (1989). Immigrant Students: Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools. A Guide for Advocates and Educators. This document is a guide to the immigrant student's legal right of access to public schools based on the 1982 United States Supreme Court ruling in "Plyler v. Doe" (457 U.S. 202). Following an introduction, the first of three sections, "School Practices," addresses everyday school practices by outlining prohibited and recommended practices concerning registration, documentation, verification, relations with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, staff training, the need for regulations and rumor control, along with recommended actions for state and local election agencies. The second section, "The Right of Access," addresses the Plyler ruling itself and the legal reasoning behind it. The third section, "Parents and Advocates," addresses the role of parents and community members in insuring that schools abide by and respect the Plyler rights of immigrant students. This section contains supplements on foreign student status and relevant search and seizure legislation written to provide more in-depth legal information. In certain parts of the first two sections, statements of principles address the specific issues at hand, while a later portion of the text presents the legal justification of the principle. This format enables readers to choose the level of analysis they wish to pursue. Included is a table of cases, endnotes, an appendix of sample materials, and an eight-item bibliography. Descriptors: Access to Education, Child Advocacy, Civil Rights, Court Litigation

Gutiérrez, Leticia Alvarez (2016). "¬°Ya basta con la ciudadanía restrictiva!": Undocumented Latina/o Young People and Their Families' Participatory Citizenship, International Journal of Multicultural Education. This article describes a community-based participatory action research project (PAR), "Voces Diversas e Importantes" [Diverse and Important Voices] that the intergenerational Family School Partnership (FSP) collective enacted to support citizenship participation and increase the possibilities undocumented Latina/o students and families have for transforming practices and perspectives within the school context and community. In this PAR project undocumented young people and their families challenge the notion that legal citizenship alone provides educational rights and equity. Central to this study is how participants troubled and disrupted the racialization and gendered components of citizenship as well transformed their participation into leadership practices that leveraged organizational changes and heightened positive educational pathways for young undocumented students in the high school.   [More]  Descriptors: Undocumented Immigrants, Hispanic Americans, Hispanic American Students, Citizen Participation

Hartman, Chester, Ed. (1995). [Focus on Immigration.], Poverty & Race. This journal issue consists of articles and other information about immigration issues, as well as discussions of the utility of racial and ethnic categories. "An International Perspective on Migration" (Cathi Tactaquin) examines the intertwined economic, political, and environmental causes of international migration; discusses how development policies such as North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) ignore labor flows across borders; and suggests that anti-immigrant measures such as California's Proposition 187 respond simplistically to heightened intolerance; and suggests that migration is an international issue, a manifestation of uneven social, political and economic development and conflict that requires cooperation and collective action among countries and regions."Immigration and the Civil Rights Movement's Response" (Bill Tamayo) examines the racist elements of anti-immigrant policies and calls for civil rights groups to come together and forcefully articulate the issues involved. "Latino Immigrants in Los Angeles: A Portrait from the 1990 Census" (David Hayes-Bautista, Werner Schink, Gregory Rodriguez) summarizes data on Latino immigrants in Los Angeles County, including census count, estimates of undocumented immigrants, labor force participation, use of public assistance, education, and family characteristics; and compares these new immigrants to immigrant Anglos of an earlier era. "Job Competition between Immigrants & African Americans" (Paul Ong, Abel Valenzuela, Jr.) focuses on the impact of immigration on the joblessness and earnings among black males in Los Angeles County between the ages of 18 and 24, and 18 and 64 with no more than a high school education. Also included in this issue are four perspectives on the meaning of racial and ethnic categories and their uses in the census and other data collection, in federal policies and programs, and as a focus for political and social organizing; a quiz "Immigration: Myths & Facts"; a list of immigrant rights organizations; and a bibliography of materials criticizing "The Bell Curve; (Murray-Herrnstein).   [More]  Descriptors: Advocacy, Blacks, Civil Rights, Demography

Multicultural Education, Training and Advocacy (META), Inc., San Francisco, CA. (1990). Un Manual para Padres y Madres Immigrantes. Proteja los Derechos de Educacion para Sus Hijos e Hijas (A Handbook for Immigrant Parents: Protect the Educational Rights of Your Children). This handbook for Spanish-speaking immigrant parents outlines the legal rights of immigrant children to educational services. All children in the United States have a right to attend school. Schools may require proof of residency and vaccination before enrollment, but a signed sworn statement attesting to the child's age may be substituted for a birth certificate. Some schools require immigrant children to be reviewed by an intake center before admission, but it is illegal for the information to be passed on to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). No high school student should be automatically placed in a freshman class without assessment of his educational background; misplacement of a limited-English-speaking student in a class for the mentally and physically disabled is a very serious problem. Children may be entitled to the following special services: (1) special education programs; (2) gifted and talented programs; (3) migrant education programs; and (4) compensatory education programs. A school district must meet special language needs. Bilingual education programs are special programs to develop English language skills and include instruction in the student's native language. These programs usually afford the best opportunity to learn English. Schools also have an obligation to provide parents with information in a language they can understand. Parents have a right to a formal hearing with a lawyer if their child is suspended or expelled. Parents also have a right to inspect and review their child's education records. A list of legislative decisions guaranteeing immigrant childrens' rights is appended. Descriptors: Bilingual Education Programs, Educational Legislation, Elementary Secondary Education, Immigrants

Desmond, Charles; Goldman, Elizabeth (2008). Talking about a Revolution: Looking to the Past to Save Our Future, New England Journal of Higher Education. The face of New England is changing. Immigrant populations, people from low-income families, and young people of color are now among the fastest-growing populations in New England. In addition, the foundation of the region's economic prosperity is expected to be intellectual. In this article, the authors discuss how New England's six land-grant universities–the Universities of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont–are best positioned to assume leadership and champion a massive transformation of education. The land-grants' purpose is broader and reaches further than that of private colleges and universities. Land-grants exist to serve, protect and advance the public's values, ideals and interests. To do this, they must fight to ensure that the reality of educational excellence and opportunity remains available and accessible to all through the concerted, unified, and rigorous use of knowledge to improve teaching practice. With the right leadership, the authors state that this region can provide for all its students the rigorous education the future will demand of them and create the revolution necessary for everyone.   [More]   [More]  Descriptors: Land Grant Universities, Leadership, Low Income Groups, Immigrants

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