Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 16 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Bridget A. Cotner, Sherick A. Hughes, William H. Jeynes, Andre M. Perry, Jean Michael, John Willshire Carrera, Theodorea Regina Berry, Kathryn M. Borman, Yiannis Roussakis, and Spencer E. Cahill.

Peters, Jason (2013). Emerging Voices: "Speak White": Language Policy, Immigration Discourse, and Tactical Authenticity in a French Enclave in New England, College English. This article provides a historical case study of the Sentinelle Affair, a conflict between French language rights and the English Only educational policies of the Catholic Church in New England in the 1920s. An analysis of this conflict reveals a correspondence between programs of language centralization and the production of language differences in the United States. The article explores the possibility that such language histories of white ethnic groups might provide grounds for creating what Malea Powell calls "a rhetoric and composition alliance."   [More]  Descriptors: French, Immigrants, Whites, Ethnic Groups

Association for Children of New Jersey (2007). Picture the Future: 2007 Annual Report. This paper presents the annual report of the Association for Children of New Jersey (ACNJ) for 2007. In 2007, ACNJ made the future better for children by: (1) Successfully advocating for an expansion of high-quality preschool through increased funding in the FY 2008 state budget and inclusion of a major preschool expansion in the new school funding formula introduced in December 2007; (2) Securing passage of legislation to create a seamless system for students to transfer credits from two-year to four-year state colleges; (3) Advocating for expansion of the state Earned Income Tax Credit, which ensures that by 2010, 282,000 more families will be entitled to a refund; (4) Publishing a special Kids Count report on children in immigrant families; (5) Empowering the 5,100 members of ACNJ's Make Kids Count NJ network to act on behalf of children; (6) Helping more than 500 families access services in special education and child welfare; and (7) Educating thousands of New Jersey citizens on the needs and rights of children through publications, forums, trainings and e-mails. [For the 2006 annual report, see ED498919.]   [More]  Descriptors: Preschool Education, State Government, Funding Formulas, Politics of Education

Clark-Kasimu, Nakachi (2015). Serving Refugee Students and Unaccompanied Minors: More than Just Learning English, Voices in Urban Education. Unrest, crime, and poverty in Central America and other parts of the world have led to periodic migrations of unaccompanied children and young refugees into the United States. These children then enroll in U.S. schools–public education for all children, including undocumented children, is a right guaranteed by the 1982 "Plyler v. Doe" decision. Many of these young people have experienced intensive trauma and have legal, socio-economic, and other needs far beyond learning English, which must be met for them to advance academically. To help meet those needs, many schools have been reaching out to community partners who specialize in working with this population of unaccompanied minors. "VUE" guest editor Ruth López spoke with Nakachi Clark-Kasimu, former after-school coordinator at the San Francisco-based nonprofit Refugee Transitions, about the lessons and challenges of this work.   [More]  Descriptors: Refugees, School Community Programs, Tutoring, Partnerships in Education

Perry, Andre M. (2006). Substantive Members Should Receive Financial Aid, Journal of Hispanic Higher Education. Policy makers have not reached a reasonable consensus on whether undocumented immigrants should receive financial aid nor developed a consistent set of conditions for eligibility. This article builds on an earlier case study and explores some of the critical issues that prevent actors from creating policy that reflects our underlying attitudes of membership. It addresses critical points of tension so that readers and policy makers can possibly reconcile intuitions and actions.   [More]  Descriptors: Undocumented Immigrants, Student Financial Aid, Eligibility, Case Studies

Mattheou, Dimitrios; Roussakis, Yiannis; Theocharis, Dimitris (2006). Who Carries the National Flag?: The Politics of Cultural Identity in the Increasingly Multicultural Greek School, European Education. The change in the composition of the school population as a result of the extensive influx of immigrants in Greece has brought in a recurrent controversy on the issue of allowing non-Greek citizen to carry the national flag, the Greek's most cherished national emblem, as a reward for an excellent school performance. When a state legislator, many decades ago, instructed the teachers' board of each school to award the pupil with the highest marks the supreme honor of carrying the national flag in the parades commemorating the two national holidays on 28 October and 25 March, he could not have foreseen this development. To some, the national flag symbolizes the glorious wars for independence and the achievements of national integration. These people argue that the flag should not be belittled by turning it into a mere prize for pupils excelling in school, least of all when this prize is given to a foreigner. At the other end of public opinion, the case of the flag-in-school controversy represents discrimination against immigrant children, which not only hurts their feelings but also constitutes a violation of basic democratic principles and fundamental human rights. This debate reveals not only the passions of those involved but also a broader ideological agitation that has been slowly developing in Greek society over the past fifteen years. Here, the authors examine the flag-in-school controversy through the lens of national identity, not only as it is conceived of today, but as it has evolved and been interpreted and institutionalized over the past two centuries. The purpose of this investigation is to understand and appreciate the problems of and prospects for using the education system to instill a common identity and purpose in a society that has become, for the first time in its history, multicultural.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Politics of Education, Nationalism, Awards

Michael, Jean (1984). Becoming a Citizen: A Newcomer's Guide. 1. A bilingual pamphlet containing practical law-related information for recent Russian Jewish immigrants to New York City, this document discusses the process of becoming a United States citizen. Following a very brief description of the Newcomer series, 10 questions are listed, each followed by an answer. Questions asked include how to obtain a green card; the difference between a refugee, a parolee, and an immigrant; rights and responsibilities of refugees; how to help additional family members come to the United States and responsibilities involved in bringing relatives to this country; when to apply for citizenship; how to apply for citizenship; the rights and responsibilities of a United States citizen; the rights of refugees when traveling outside the United States, and the documents necessary for travel once permanent residency is obtained. A final page, titled "Where to Go for Help," lists the addresses and phone numbers of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Inc.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, Citizenship, Citizenship Education, Citizenship Responsibility

Carrera, John Willshire (1992). Immigrant Students, Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools. A Guide for Advocates and Educators. Revised. This updated version of a 1989 document of the same title represents a guide to the immigrant student's legal right of access to public schools based on the 1982 United States Supreme Court ruling in "Plyler v. Doe." Following an introduction, the first of three sections, "School Practices," addresses everyday school practices by outlining prohibited and recommended practices concerning registration, documentation, verification, relations with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, staff training, the need for regulations and rumor control, along with recommended actions for state and local education agencies. The second section, "The Right of Access," addresses the Plyler ruling itself, and the legal reasoning behind it. The third section, "Parents and Advocates," addresses the role of parents and community members in ensuring that schools abide by and respect Plyler and other educational rights of immigrant students. This section contains supplements on foreign student status and relevant search and seizure legislation written to provide more in-depth legal information. In certain parts of the first two sections, statements of principles address the specific issues at hand, while a later format enables readers to choose the level of analysis they wish to pursue. A table of cases, endnotes, list of contacts, an appendix of sample materials, and a 20-item bibliography are included. Descriptors: Access to Education, Child Advocacy, Civil Rights, Court Litigation

Rincon, Alejandra (2010). !Si se puede!: Undocumented Immigrants' Struggle for Education and Their Right to Stay, Journal of College Admission. In this article, the author talks about an increasing movement that generates support for the Dream Act, the federal proposal which would allow some undocumented students to begin the path towards permanent residency. Beginning in Summer 2009, when more than 500 converged in DC for a national Dream Act graduation ceremony, students and their allies have organized a number of activities to build support for this proposal culminating with the national "Back to School Day of Action." The movement for in-state tuition has involved a multi-prong approach combining individual struggles by undocumented students to fight their deportation orders, continuous efforts to pass equal tuition laws at the state level, changes within institutions of higher education and increasing pressure to pass the federal Dream Act. While the movement has grown in many different states, arguments in favor of the students have remained the same. The author stresses that the nature and usefulness of these arguments should be considered as this population fights against being demonized and for their basic recognition as human beings. The key arguments for and against undocumented students' presence in institutions of higher education fall into three broad categories: (1) economics; (2) cultural assimilation; and (3) crime deterrence. This article briefly reviews each type of argument.   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Undocumented Immigrants, State Legislation, Federal Legislation

Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; Cahill, Spencer E., Ed.; Cotner, Bridget A., Ed. (2007). The Praeger Handbook of American High Schools. Volume 4, Praeger. Written by an interdisciplinary group of experts in education, psychology, sociology, and other fields, this landmark handbook provides a thorough examination of U.S. secondary education from the private academies of Colonial America to the comprehensive high schools and alternative schools of today. This accessible compendium is a treasure trove of reliable and authoritative information for educators, parents, and students. It includes original entries on assessment, architecture, bullying, campus life, censorship, college preparation, desegregation, disabilities, ethnic identity, family and community involvement, finance inequality, gangs, home schooling, homework, immigrants, intelligence, learning styles, magnet schools, mentoring, peer groups and peer culture, prom, reunions, rural schools, school boards, school to work programs, sex education, sports, standardized tests, student rights, teacher certification, teacher shortage, test preparation, violence, vouchers, and yearbooks, just to name a few. The text includes primary documents, each with scene and context-setting introductions, such as reports, legislation, and US Supreme Court cases will be found as well. Thorough cross-referencing enables the user to follow a topic from an entry to a primary document or another related entry. This wide-ranging, accessible and user-friendly source is an authoritative reference for anyone concerned with high schools and high school students in the United States. This fourth volume is divided into the following sections: (1) Preface; (2) Introduction; (3) List of Documents; (4) Legislation; (5) Reports and Books; and (6) Index. [For Volume 1, see ED495146. For Volume 2, see ED495109. For Volume 3, see ED495104.]   [More]  Descriptors: Reference Materials, Court Litigation, Equal Education, Access to Education

Hughes, Sherick A., Ed.; Berry, Theodorea Regina, Ed. (2012). The Evolving Significance of Race: Living, Learning, and Teaching, Peter Lang New York. Individuals are living, learning, and teaching by questioning how to address race in a society that consistently prefers to see itself as colorblind, a society claiming to seek a "post-racial" existence. This edited volume offers evidence of the evolving significance of race from a diverse group of male and female contributors self-identifying as Black, Latino, Asian, White, Gay, Lesbian, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim. Individuals' attempts to provide every child and adult learner with what they need–equity–to make the most of their educational experiences–excellence–are still consciously and unconsciously thwarted by the ingrained nature of racism in this society. This point becomes obvious when individuals begin teaching those audiences that represent diverse lived experiences of race about the changing significance of race and how to develop a more critical, reflexive lens focused upon the politics of race. This book invites readers to co-construct and implement a critical race pedagogy that reflects both an acknowledgment of the evolving significance of race and opportunities for hope via education. Contents include: (1) Foreword (Marvin Lynn); (2) Introduction (Sherick Hughes, Theodorea Regina Berry, and Rod Carey); (3) Father, Daughter, and Schooling–Curriculum Theorizing From a Critical Race Feminist Perspective (Theodorea Regina Berry); (4) Two Scoops Vanilla: Teaching Against the Notion of White Savior (Brian D. Schultz); (5) Constructing Space for Elementary School Students to Talk About Race and Take Action to Create Change (Sachi Feris); (6) Owning the "Buts": High School Students Confront History and Heterosexism (Connie North); (7) Youth Teaching Teachers: Bridging Racial and Cultural Divides Between Teachers and Students (Tara M. Brown, Summer Clark, and Thurman Bridges); (8) Breaking the Cycle of Racism in the Classroom: Critical Race Reflections From Future Teachers of Color (Rita Kohli); (9) Maggie and Me: A Black Professor and a White Urban School Teacher Connect Autoethnography to Critical Race Pedagogy (Sherick Hughes); (10) Du Boisian Double Consciousness in the Multicultural Classroom and the Questions It Raises (Hilton Kelly); (11) An Academic in the Classroom: Uncovering and Resisting the Barriers to Racial Equity in Public School (Benjamin Blaisdell); (12) Understanding Equity: A "Brown" Lesson in a Teacher Education Program From a Critical Race Feminist Perspective (Theodorea Regina Berry); (13) Where Am I Going, Where Have I Been? A Critical Reflexion on Black-Jewish Relations, Jewish Political Shifts to the Right, and the Preparation of Young Jewish Women for Teaching "Other People's Children" (Josh Diem); (14) La Politica Vecindaria: A Micro to Macro Lens on Immigrant Newcomer Students in U.S. Schools (Leticia Alvarez and Francisco Rios); (15) Race, Wealth, and the Commons (Dedrick Muhammad and Chuck Collins); (16) Profitting From Racism: A Family History of How Race and Class Privilege Created Wealth (Cooper Thompson); (17) The Myth and Math of Affirmative Action (Goodwin Liu); (18) Toward an Informed and Transparent Philosophy of Racial Diversity for Colleges of Education (Sherick Hughes and Dale Snauwaert); (19) The Race for President and a Precedent for Race: Lessons from NCLB and Bringing Race to the Top (Zeus Leonardo); and (20) Interview "I'm the Daughter of a U.S. Marine": An Interview With Nadia Hassan on the Racialization, Misrepresentation, and Mistreatment of Muslim Women in Post-9/11 America (Nadia Hassan and Sherick Hughes).   [More]  Descriptors: Race, Racial Bias, Social Bias, Critical Theory

Karsten, Sjoerd (2006). Freedom of Education and Common Civic Values, European Education. A critical issue facing European school systems and one with broad social implications is how to accommodate the different demands of a growing number of non-Western immigrants, particularly Muslims. "Historically, faith-based schools have provided a route for immigrants, refugees and minorities…to gain a foothold in their new country, yet the extent to which states should endorse faith schools, as part of publicly funded schooling, has been the source of ongoing debate and dispute." Does the distinctive religious character of these faith schools inhibit the promotion of common civic values? Until recently in Europe, there were two radically opposed policy orientations with respect to cultural diversity in education and the way to integrate migrants from diverse cultures: multiculturalism and civic integration. Currently, however, there is a retreat from multiculturalism all over Europe, due to the perceived failures of official multiculturalist policies, the rise of populist movements with programs centered around the issue of immigration, and threats to the liberal constitutional state in the form of terrorism. This is most visible in Britain and the Netherlands, two of the three European societies (the other being Sweden) that have so far been most committed to official multiculturalism. In the Netherlands this is mainly expressed in attitudes toward Muslim immigrants in general and Islamic institutions such as schools in particular. The Dutch system of education, which ensures independence and full state funding for religious schools, has long been seen as an example for other countries to emulate. The right to educational pluralism, as it exists in the Netherlands, its relatively good performance in international comparisons, and the image of a tolerant liberal society offered an attractive prospect to supporters of more freedom of parental choice in education. It is questionable, however, whether this general rosy image really fits in with reality today, with the present struggle in Dutch society on the fundamental question of whether the present system that promotes freedom and autonomy in education can contribute to the integration of migrants and social cohesion in society. This article addresses that question. This article also discusses the issues faced by the Netherlands: philosophical neutrality of government; subsidizing of private initiatives, and approaches to ethnic minority policy.   [More]  Descriptors: Freedom, Role of Education, Civics, Values

Girard, Alain (1974). Immigrations into Industrialized Countries. The Education of Migrant Workers — Where Do We Stand?, Prospects. The social and economic implications of migration for both the countries of arrival and the countries of departure are discussed. The right of the immigrant and his children to education is viewed as a "constant", despite political of economic policy. Descriptors: Developed Nations, Developing Nations, Labor Utilization, Migrant Education

Chavez McKay, Claudia Estela (2010). The Contributions of the Unwanted, ProQuest LLC. According to the U.S. Constitution as construed by the "Plyler v. Doe," 457 U.S. 202 (1982) Supreme Court Case, all children in the United States–from kindergarten through grade twelve–have a right to a free public education regardless of citizenship; however, undocumented students seeking to continue their education beyond high school face multiple barriers. Little is known about the actual experiences of undocumented students who have acquired a university degree. The purpose of this study was to understand the collegiate experiences of undocumented students, specifically the process of persisting through college graduation and their contributions to society post graduation.   This study employed qualitative data methods to explore undocumented students' collegiate experiences. Twenty-one in-depth interviews were conducted. A concept modeling approach (Padilla, 1991) was the method of data analysis used to understand and describe their experiences. The following research questions guided the study: 1) How do undocumented students access U.S. colleges? 2) What barriers complicate their efforts to persist? 3) What factors support their efforts to persist? 4) In what ways have undocumented college graduates contributed to society?   The findings of the study revealed that accessing and persisting through college involved several elements of encouragement and discouragement. The elements of encouragement included: college preparatory programs and events, advice from counselors and teachers, private scholarships, family and friends, networking groups, and life improvements. The elements of discouragement consisted of: the predicament of having undocumented status, advice from counselors, the lack of federal funds available for undocumented students, economic hardships, familial obstacles, and undocumented stigmatism. In addition, the data indicated a number of ways participants contributed to society. For example, upon college graduation all participants choose careers in the helping professions. They became teachers, counselors, advisors, medical doctors, scholars, and administrators. The significance of this study contributed to the knowledge of student persistence in higher education, immigrant student experiences, and state and federal immigration policy.   [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.%5D   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Persistence, College Graduates, Court Litigation, Data Collection

Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; Cahill, Spencer E., Ed.; Cotner, Bridget A., Ed. (2007). The Praeger Handbook of American High Schools. Volume 1, Praeger. Written by an interdisciplinary group of experts in education, psychology, sociology, and other fields, this landmark handbook provides a thorough examination of U.S. secondary education from the private academies of Colonial America to the comprehensive high schools and alternative schools of today. This accessible compendium is a treasure trove of reliable and authoritative information for educators, parents, and students. It includes original entries on assessment, architecture, bullying, campus life, censorship, college preparation, desegregation, disabilities, ethnic identity, family and community involvement, finance inequality, gangs, home schooling, homework, immigrants, intelligence, learning styles, magnet schools, mentoring, peer groups and peer culture, prom, reunions, rural schools, school boards, school to work programs, sex education, sports, standardized tests, student rights, teacher certification, teacher shortage, test preparation, violence, vouchers, and yearbooks, just to name a few. The text includes primary documents, each with scene and context-setting introductions, such as reports, legislation, and US Supreme Court cases will be found as well. Thorough cross-referencing enables the user to follow a topic from an entry to a primary document or another related entry. This wide-ranging, accessible and user-friendly source is an authoritative reference for anyone concerned with high schools and high school students in the United States. This first volume is divided into the following sections: (1) Preface; (2) Introduction; (3) List of Entries; (4) Guide to Related Entries; and (5) Entries A-H. [For Volume 2, see ED495109. For Volume 3, see ED495104. For Volume 4, see ED495100.]   [More]  Descriptors: Federal Legislation, Civil Rights, Educational History, Private Education

Jeynes, William H. (2004). Immigration in the United States and the Golden Years of Education: Was Ravitch Right?, Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association. In this article I address some assertions made by one of the most outstanding educational historians, Diane Ravitch, regarding the relation between immigration rates and academic achievement among children in the United States. In her book The Great School Wars Ravitch asserted that low immigration levels during the 1920s to early 1960s period played a large role in producing a golden age of education in New York and probably in the United States. The research undertaken for this article does confirm some of Ravitch's assertions but questions whether other claims of hers may be overly simplistic. Among her assertions that the research supports are that academic achievement rose among New York City elementary and secondary students during this "golden age," children from most immigrant groups did perform poorly compared to children born in the United States, and that the increased volume of enrollment and language factors did exert added pressure on the school system. Nevertheless, other factors lead one to believe that Ravitch's claim, although possessing merit, may be overly simplistic. For example, certain immigrant groups performed very well academically after coming to the United States. This fact supports the notion that the makeup of the immigrant population may be as important as the immigration volume. In addition, the decline in American student academic achievement in the 1960s and 1970s began well before the United States fully liberalized its immigration policy. One would not expect this, if immigration has the level of impact that Ravitch claims.   [More]  Descriptors: Historians, Immigration, Academic Achievement, Immigrants

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