Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 32 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Marquita L. Byrd, Linda Pollack Shevitz, Broadus N. Butler, Jennifer L. Gordon, Susan Morris Shaffer, Susan Rosenblum, The Fund for Free Expression: A Committee of Human Rights Watch, F. Michael Perko, Lewis N. Wynne, and Diego Castellanos.

Shevitz, Linda Pollack; Shaffer, Susan Morris (1997). Women's Journeys, Women's Stories: In Search of Our Multicultural Future. Units in U.S. Women's History. Student Manual. This collection of curriculum units in U.S. history tells some of the untold women's stories that describe some of the historical events and social settings of the past and illustrate some trends for the future. These stories are intended to encourage middle school and junior high school students to explore contemporary women's history themes that correlate with themes previously highlighted in "In Search of Our Past," also from the Women's Educational Equity Act Resource Center. Three main units on contemporary topics are presented in both the "Teacher's Guide" and this "Student Manual." Each unit contains an introduction to the topic and background on the topic, profiles of individual women, interviews with individual women, readings about the unit topic, student activities, selected resources, and a vocabulary (some units). Units are presented on native women, women of the South (southern United States), and immigrant women, and these units encompass sections on the following cultural or historical groups: (1) American Indian women; (2) native Hawaiian women; (3) women of the South (from Civil War to civil rights); (4) Gullah women; (5) immigrant women; (6) Latinas; (7) Soviet Jewish women; and (8) contemporary women from Southeast Asia (Vietnamese).   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Asian Americans, Curriculum, Females

Perko, F. Michael (1982). Brushfire Wars: Religion, Politics, and Education in Cincinnati, 1836-1853. In Cincinnati, Ohio, between 1836 and 1853, controversy over religious education resulted from religious, ethnic, and political factors. Debate began between Catholics (mostly German and Irish immigrants) and Protestants over which Bible should be used in the public schools. (It was accepted that daily Bible readings were to be a part of religious education). A Catholic archbishop urged the use of Catholic Douay Bibles along with the already accepted King James version. In 1840, the school board refused to act upon the archbishop's recommendation and adopted the Bible of the American Bible Society. After 1852, a resolution that students read the versions of the scriptures preferred by their parents was adopted; however, the King James was still the normative version. The 1853 election issue shifted to a debate over state funding for Catholic schools, with strong anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic sentiments. Catholics focused on the rights of parents to educate their children. The election began a wave of success for evangelical Protestantism in Cincinnati and Catholics began to seek other avenues for their political and educational aspirations. Descriptors: Catholics, Educational History, Ethnic Groups, Political Issues

The Fund for Free Expression: A Committee of Human Rights Watch (1992). "English Only": The Attack on Minority Language Speakers in the United States. The aim of the "English-Only" movement is to make English the official national language. The Constitution of the United States does not mention the English language, and therefore the country has no official language. The legacy of the nation's founders is one of linguistic tolerance. The increase in immigrants from Asia and Latin America has generated a nativist backlash. Within the "English-Only" movement, U.S. English (USE) is more sophisticated and successful than groups like "English First" that are overtly much more nativist and virulently anti-immigrant. Eighteen states and numerous cities and towns have official English laws. These laws can be attacked on First, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendment grounds. The "English-Only" movement's rhetorical focus on the laudable goals of national unity and English proficiency has brought considerable financial and political success. Yet the movement is driven by cultural insecurity and prejudice against minorities. English-only laws fail to advance English proficiency or foster national unity. Instead, they promote harmful divisiveness while infringing on important minority rights. Descriptors: Anglo Americans, Asian Americans, Civil Liberties, Constitutional Law

Dummett, Anne (1978). A New Immigration Policy. This book focuses on the issue of immigration to the United Kingdom (U.K.). Causes of migration, such as economic opportunities and emergency political refuge, are discussed in terms of the need for the government to devise an effective and just immigration system. Immigration laws of Norway, Sweden, Australia, Canada, and the U.K. are outlined, and the employment situation, civic rights, standard of living, and social benefits for immigrants are described. Legal, economic, moral, and political theories behind the formulation of policy in various countries are reviewed. The history of government efforts to restrict immigration is shown to be immediately related to ethnic/racial prejudice. The 1971 Immigration Act is held to be designed principally to keep out unwanted people rather than to achieve the social or economic benefits which can accrue from a more far-sighted policy. Some alternatives are explored, taking into consideration joint policies developed by the European Economic Community and restrictions imposed on immigration from within the Commonwealth and from dependent territories. Selection principles which would allow immigration to be controlled on a non-racial basis are suggested. A new administrative machinery for the U.K. which would provide fair and courteous service to immigrants is recommended. Descriptors: Immigrants, Legislation, Migration, Public Policy

Ontario Human Rights Commission, Toronto. (1982). Race Relations: New Perspectives, New Delivery Systems for Education. Summary and Recommendations Section of the Proceedings of the Conference on Race Relations and Education (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, January 28-29, 1982). The Race Relations Division of the Ontario (Canada) Human Rights Commission states its primary goal as that of helping the institutional sector of the society to deal with problems of racism and racial discrimination. In order to forward the belief that responsibility for promoting race relations lies with key government agencies and institutions in Ontario society, a conference was held in January 1982, to discuss the promotion of racial harmony and equality within educational systems. This report summarizes the content of the conference. Five major issues are reviewed: (1) assessing and streaming of immigrant and visible minority students; (2) how curriculum can promote positive race relations; (3) developing effective race relations programs for students and teachers; (4) augmenting good school-community relations in a multiracial society; and (5) developing and implementing race relations policies. Conference participants' recommendations are outlined. Descriptors: Board of Education Role, Cultural Pluralism, Curriculum Enrichment, Educational Policy

Gordon, Jennifer L. (1989). Out of the Spotlight and into the Shadows, Migration World Magazine. Discusses the effects of the employer sanctions provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 on employers and undocumented immigrants. The following steps toward a just policy are considered: (1) repeal of employer sanctions; (2) fair treatment of Central Americans; and (3) recognition of the effect of U.S. foreign policy on immigration. Descriptors: Civil Rights, Employees, Employers, Equal Opportunities (Jobs)

Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women, Toronto (Ontario). (1990). Telling Our Stories Our Way: A Guide to Good Canadian Materials for Women Learning To Read. This guide contains reviews of 49 selected books and pamphlets of special interest to women that were identified as good Canadian materials for women learning to read by a working group of the Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women. Among the types of materials reviewed are the following: books about contraception and reproductive health; photostories about immigrant women who work in a garment factory; collection of dub poetry describing the experience of immigrant women in Canada; Black woman's reminiscences about her grandmother's life in Nova Scotia; collection of stories from the Coast Salish Native community in British Columbia; workbook detailing a model of community curriculum development; handbook for women in abusive relationships; workbook explaining Canada's human rights laws; and book of stories about women in nontraditional jobs. The reviews were written by groups of students, literacy workers, or literacy workers and students together. Each review contains some or all of the following: title; author and/or editor; publisher name/address; distributor; length; indication of whether the work incudes illustrations; and price. Each review is accompanied by a sample page from the publication reviewed. Concluding the guide is a list of guidelines for reviewing materials for use as literacy materials for women. Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Annotated Bibliographies, Beginning Reading

Shevitz, Linda Pollack; Shaffer, Susan Morris (1997). Women's Journeys, Women's Stories: In Search of Our Multicultural Future. Units in U.S. Women's History. Teacher Guide. This collection of curriculum units in U.S. history tells some of the untold women's stories that describe some of the historical events and social settings of the past and illustrate some trends for the future. These stories are intended to encourage middle school and junior high school students to explore contemporary women's history themes that correlate with themes previously highlighted in "In Search of Our Past," also from the Women's Educational Equity Act Resource Center. Three main units on contemporary topics are presented in both this "Teacher's Guide" and the "Student Manual." Each unit of the teacher's guide contains an overview of the unit, an introduction to the topic and background on the topic, ideas for additional student activities, and selected annotated resources. Units are presented on native women, women of the South (southern United States), and immigrant women, and these units encompass sections on the following cultural or historical groups: (1) American Indian women; (2) native Hawaiian women; (3) women of the South (from Civil War to civil rights); (4) Gullah women; (5) immigrant women; (6) Latinas; (7) Soviet Jewish women; and (8) contemporary women from Southeast Asia.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Asian Americans, Curriculum, Females

Banya, Kingsley (1993). Multicultural Education: An International Perspective. The various ways in which countries use their educational systems to socialize ethnic minorities to the dominant culture is the topic of this paper. Different approaches countries have taken toward the education of minorities are identified. In the "recognition approach," the rights of minority languages, culture, and education are acknowledged in national constitutions; for example, India. The "unification approach" has been used in cases of common nationality while preserving different languages and cultures of minority groups. Tanzania and its official language Kiswahili provide an example of this approach. In the "integration approach," schools, language, and external pressure are brought to bear on the immigrant to integrate into the mainstream of the homogeneous society.  The United States, Canada, and Australia have utilized this approach in recent history. The "laissez-faire" approach is prevalent in older countries that have had an influx of immigrants but chose to ignore them until problems became acute and something had to be done. Great Britain is cited as a classic example of this approach. The paper seeks to clarify the concepts of multicultural education and intercultural education, and discusses the problems multicultural education has encountered in trying to achieve legitimation. (Contains 33 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Influences, Cultural Interrelationships, Cultural Pluralism, Educational Policy

Wynne, Lewis N. (1981). The Role of Freedmen in the Post Bellum Cotton Economy, Phylon. Following the removal of the Freedman's Bureau and failure of labor recruitment efforts targeted to Chinese and European immigrants, the practices of sharecropping, tenant farming, and the hiring of convict labor replaced slave labor in the South's postbellum agricultural economy. Lack of minimal economic power among freed Blacks resulted in slave labor conditions.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Laborers, Blacks, Civil Rights, Economic Change

Butler, Broadus N. (1981). Humanity, U.S. Immigration and Refugee Policy and the Select Commission, Crisis. Examines United States policy and practices in regard to immigrants and refugees. Observes that recent changes in refugee and immigration legislation may have provided the catalyst for less racial and ethnic discrimination in American domestic and foreign policy. Suggests that current trends point to the possibility of unity in cultural pluralism.   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Rights, Cultural Pluralism, Demography, Ethnic Discrimination

Rosenblum, Susan (1996). Union-Sponsored Workplace ESL Instruction. ERIC Digest. Labor unions have provided English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction in the workplace since the early 1900s, to serve a growing immigrant workforce. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, an increase in immigrant population, decline in manufacturing jobs, new technology, and work restructuring brought a new urgency to union-sponsored worker education, primarily to provide workers with access to training. The need for communication skills, problem-solving skills, and knowledge of workplace organization for the high-performance workplace has recently emerged as a new need. Programs usually involve a partnership of unions, businesses, and educational entities. These may include union consortia, joint union-company partnership funds, or individual unions forming partnerships with employers and educators. Workplace ESL instruction and curricula for union programs incorporate the range of approaches and techniques found in many adult ESL programs. While the major focus is on job-related language skills, the programs may also teach general life skills, worker rights and responsibilities, problem-solving and critical thinking, and health safety. Contains 11 references. (MSE)   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Agency Cooperation, Course Content, Curriculum Design

Byrd, Marquita L. (1983). Legal and Ethical Implications for Teaching the Student Speaking Multiple Dialects. Until the 1880s, the language of instruction and that spoken by students was dictated by the culture of the community. Although public officials advised immigrants to use American English rather than their mother tongues, no legislation was enacted mandating English as the official language of education. However, with sizeable groups of immigrants arriving in the late 1800s, political issues and xenophobia brought about federal legislation and legislation in 32 states mandating English as the only language of instruction. By 1920 and until the 1960s, testing in English was used for screening people for employment and voting. Based on public laws of the last 20 years and results of court litigation, it appears educators must be careful to avoid systematic exclusion of culturally and/or linguistically different students from the learning experience due to either their inability to understand the language of instruction or the teacher's inability to appreciate their speech community. Although no student has a constitutional right to a specific educational experience, each is protected from denial of access to education because of language barriers. However, the tendency to Anglify students and eradicate language differences remains, preventing many students' full participation in the educational process.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Acculturation, Bidialectalism, Black Dialects

Castellanos, Diego; Leggio, Pamela (1983). The Best of Two Worlds: Bilingual-Bicultural Education in the U.S. This history of bilingual education in the United States begins with the advent of the Spanish in the early 16th century, and traces the development of the phenomenon to the present. Chapters cover (1) early immigration of Spanish and Germans before the Revolution, (2) early 19th century xenophobia, (3) bilingual schooling in the early 19th century, (4) bilingual education's decline in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, (5) the Puerto Rican influx in the mid-20th century, (6) the rise and failure of instruction in English as a second language (ESL), (7) the 1960s renaissance of bilingual education, (8) the federal bilingual act (Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965) and its implementation, (9) the ethnic awareness movement of the mid-1970's, (10) the peak of the bilingual movement, and (11) the aftermath of the Lau v. Nichols ruling. Also included are chapters on (1) variations on the bilingual concept, (2) a comparison of concepts of bilingual education and school desegregation, (3) the status of bilingual education in the bicentennial year, (4) program evaluation efforts and results, (5) denial of educational services to undocumented immigrants and challenges to Lau remedies, (6) issues of accountability, (7) foreign language deficiencies and linguistic chauvinism in American society, (8) the increasing need for bilingual instruction due to immigrant influx and other needy language minorities, (9) the 1979 proposed Lau regulations, (10) the recent shrinkage of the federal role in education, (11) headline immigrant language issues, (12) jeopardy to some individual rights, and (13) some projections and suggestions.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Activism, Adult Education, Bilingual Education

Batt, Karen (1988). We're All in the Same Boat. A Multi-Cultural and Pre-Vocational ESL Curriculum for Intermediate ESL Students. This curriculum manual combines the teaching of English as a second language (ESL) with multicultural and prevocational education. The materials provide students with information about immigration, how immigrants fit into the economic system and society, and how different cultures and races have evolved. Goals are to give students the opportunity to relate this information to their own lives and to provide language exercises. The six chapters are: "They Broke My Car Window!" (prejudice, stereotypes, poverty, homeless persons, migrant farm workers, the elderly, the unemployed, crime and ghetto life); Common Ground (values, feelings, and experiences in common); "What's He So Angry About?" (slavery, segregation and discrimination, civil rights movement); "We're All in the Same Boat Now!" (history of immigration, immigrants); Why We Look and Live the Way We Do (race, culture); and "I Got a Job! But…" (helping or hurting each other, unions and safety, words for work). Each chapter contains a dialogue that sets the theme; questions on comprehension and for oral discussion; a picture series for use as oral practice in telling a connected narrative; and reading, vocabulary, and listening exercises. The teacher's guide at the end of each chapter provides answers to exercises, instructions for accomplishing certain exercises, and suggestions on how to present certain exercises.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Cultural Awareness, Curriculum Guides, English (Second Language)

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