Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 37 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Rosemary Milne, Charles P. Cozic, Lita Linzer Schwartz, OSCAR HANDLIN, Holda Dorsey, Natalie Isser, Washington Congress of the U.S., Ed Kissam, Hongwei He, and C. Frederick Risinger.

Risinger, C. Frederick (1976). Women in Working Class Ethnic Communities. "Controversial Issues Kit" No. 2. This kit provides a summary of a scholarly paper, discussion questions, and activities to promote constructive debate between scholars and ethnic groups about the role of women in working class ethnic communities. The paper identifies these women as descendants of immigrant women who still live in large industrial centers of the East and Midwest. Although they are regarded as "traditional" and "passive," their role in history shows that they were instrumental in supplementing or providing the only family income and in keeping their families and social organizations strong and active. The feminist movement does not include them, but social changes occurring at the present time are harming their personal identity and self-concept. Their husbands are threatened because some wives must work fulltime to help meet the cost of living. They are aggressively active about socioeconomic concerns. Questions relevant to the lives of these women include the effect of the Equal Rights Amendment and the diluting effect on ethnicity from participation in the permanent job force. One of the six related activities involves comparing marriage expectations of ethnic women when they were age 20 to what they expect today.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Discussion, Employed Women

McDiarmid, Garnet; Pratt, David (1971). Teaching Prejudice: A Content Analysis of Social Studies Textbooks Authorized for Use in Ontario. This report of a study, undertaken at the request of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, details: 1) precedents and historical backgrounds in textbook analysis; 2) the methodology of the present study; and, 3) recommendations based on the findings. Groups selected for study were: Jews, immigrants, Moslems, Negroes, and American Indians. The research design called for quantitative analysis of "evaluative assertions" made about the above groups in all textbooks authorized for use in grades 1-12, and in print on June 1, 1968. Findings indicate that facts and theories which are outmoded, even false, still find their way into textbooks, dealing a heavy dose of "un-themism." Further, there is little attempt in school texts to discuss in any detail basic issues concerning racial differences or prejudice. Given the strong reliance on textbook teaching which still prevails, these are serious faults. It is recommended that: 1) for errors of commission, the publishers be asked to make appropriate revisions; 2) for errors of omission, books be sought or commissioned which provide scholarly, up-to-date information on minorities and the dynamics of prejudice; and, 3) that these be approved for use on the Ontario schools. Appendices contain a listing of the textbooks analyzed, as well as a technical discussion of the investigative technique which can be used by students, teachers, and other researchers. Descriptors: American Indians, Blacks, Ethnic Groups, Ethnic Stereotypes

Park Forest Public Schools District 163, IL. (1970). Fifth Grade Social Studies Unit and Student Readings. The social studies resource unit and student readings for fifth grade pupils present the main idea that America is a heterogeneous society composed of different racial, religious, cultural, and ethnic groups who have continued the struggle to gain equal rights and opportunities. Pupils discover where immigrants came from, why they came to America, and what their problems of adjustment were after arrival. Study and analysis of democratic ideals and values leads to an understanding that they are not applied equally to minority groups. Past treatment of Indians, and Negroes is examined. Activities that provide opportunities for learning how it feels to be discriminated against are given. Emphasis is upon recognition of the many cultural and political contributions made by the ethnic groups. Thinking tasks supplied in this unit are on concept formation, interpretation of data, and application of generalizations. Twenty-five learning activities are coordinated with the thinking tasks. Supplementary features include a bibliography of books, filmstrips, films, and maps, and three teacher appendices. (Related documents are: ED 048 035 through ED 048 041.)   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Concept Teaching, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences

He, Hongwei (1996). Chinese Students' Approach to Learning English: Psycholinguistic and Sociolinguistic Perspectives. A study examined the historical, cultural, social, pedagogical, and psychological factors affecting Chinese students' language learning styles and attitudes, particularly concerning learning English as a Second Language (ESL). The first section offers an overview of considerations in understanding the cultural background that students bring to the classroom (learning philosophy, learning styles, affective factors), and the second section extends this analysis to students in the Chinese culture. Educational philosophy and history and the current Chinese educational system are discussed. Aspects of learning style examined in this context include field independence, analytic learning, visual preference, orientation to closure, cooperative learning, left and right brain functions, and tolerance of ambiguity. Affective factors include self-esteem, inhibition, risk-taking, introversion, sensitivity, and anxiety. In the third section, results of a survey of Chinese students concerning their learning preferences are reported. The survey consisted of a questionnaire on language learning strategies, administered to 31 Chinese immigrants in southern California, and interviews with 21 Chinese individuals. Results are analyzed, with excerpts from subjects' responses used for illustration. Implications for ESL teachers are explored. The questionnaire, interview questions, and sample lessons from a Chinese primer are appended. Contains 50 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Anxiety, Cognitive Style, Educational Attitudes, English (Second Language)

HANDLIN, OSCAR (1966). THE GOALS OF INTEGRATION. THE LACK OF CLEARLY DEFINED GOALS WITHIN THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IS IMPEDING ITS TACTICS AND MOMENTUM. THE STATED GOAL OF INTEGRATION ACTUALLY HAS TWO ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATIONS–FULL LEGAL EQUALITY AND RACIAL BALANCE. THE NEWER STRESS ON RACIAL BALANCE RESTS ON THE FALLACIOUS ASSUMPTIONS THAT THE NEGRO'S SITUATION IS UNIQUE BECAUSE OF SLAVERY AND COLOR, AND THAT ONLY MASSIVE GOVERNMENTAL ACTION CAN COUNTERACT THE DEEPLY INGRAINED AMERICAN RACISM. ACTUALLY, THE NEGRO'S CURRENT DISADVANTAGE IS A RESULT OF THE PROBLEMS OF URBANIZATION AND ACCULTURATION WHICH THE NEGRO SHARES WITH OTHER IMMIGRANTS, AND THE IMPORTANCE OF COLOR DEPENDS UPON THE SOCIAL ASSESSMENT OF IT, WHICH VARIES WITH THE TIMES. SOUTHERN INEQUALITY MUST BE UNDERSTOOD AS A PATHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENT TO THE SOCIAL DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING ABOLITION, WHEREAS NORTHERN INEQUALITY DERIVES FROM INFORMAL ASSOCIATIONS OF GROUPS ACCORDING TO KINSHIP OR COMMUNITY. INTEGRATION AS AN "ELIMINATION OF DISTINCTIVENESS" IS IRRELEVANT TO THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC PLIGHT OF NEGROES, MOST OF WHOM ARE CONCERNED WITH DESEGREGATED EQUALITY, NOT WITH INTEGRATION. SEPARATENESS SHOULD NOT BE OBLITERATED, BECAUSE DOING SO WOULD DESTROY THE VERY NEGRO INSTITUTIONS WHICH THROUGH A FOCUS ON GROUP INTERESTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP CAN HELP THE RACE TOWARD SOLUTIONS OF THEIR PROBLEMS.   [More]  Descriptors: Blacks, Civil Rights, Education, Educationally Disadvantaged

Tsu, John B. (1977). The Future of Asian Bilingual and Bicultural Education. In this paper, one of the pioneers of Chinese language instruction in the United States reviews the development of bilingual education under public funds, summarizes criticism against it, and proposes approaches and methodologies to improve it. Emphasis is placed on the need to insure the future of bilingual education by paying attention to and answering the criticisms listed and on attempting to solve some of the problems still faced in developing and refining bilingual programs. Continuing financial support is called for, based on the facts that there are millions of children (thousands of them Asians) who require bilingual education, and that immigrant children continue to flow into this country. The doctrine of civil rights and equal education, the favorable Supreme Court decision in the case of Lau Vs. Nichols, and the emergent political power of ethnic groups are also used to illustrate optimism about the future of bilingual education. Recommendations for future bilingual education considerations are provided with particular reference to Asian American culture. Descriptors: Asian Americans, Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Bilingualism

Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda (1997). Women's Work Issues. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 2. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project. This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on the problems faced by immigrant women in their work lives and legal provisions to protect employed women. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills addressed in the module; teaching points (points dealing with basic rights, strategic thinking, and decision making); sample learning activities; list of 8 organizational and print resources and 16 commercial ESL textbooks; resource sheets; sample lesson plan; transparency masters; learning activities and student handouts concerning sexual harassment and other women's work issues; pre- and postmodule student surveys; and scoring directions. The following objectives are addressed in the module lesson: be able to discuss work conditions with coworkers, engage in role play activities simulating communication with supervisors, and devise ways to address sexual harassment situations. Included in the lesson plan are the following: objectives, a description of target audience and context, room setup guidelines, lists of items needed and media used, and detailed instructions for conducting the lesson.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Employed Women, Employment Practices

Cockcroft, James D. (1995). Latinos in the Making of the United States. The Hispanic Experience in the Americas. Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Cubans, Central Americans, and South Americans, all so-called "Hispanics," or "Latinos," have brought their working hands and all of their skills and talents to the United States. They have come from many places to become the United States' fastest growing minority group. By the 1990 Census, Hispanics were living in many parts of the country. Like other immigrant workers, they have been significant producers in national industrialization. Today, they are crucial for the future of the United States' cities. How vital Latinos are to the nation's existence is detailed in two chapters that concentrate on their roles as farm workers and as health care providers. A subsequent chapter explores Hispanic participation in the labor movement. Of particular interest is a chapter on schools, focusing on the struggle for equal educational opportunity and the controversy about bilingual education. Years of stereotyping have resulted in reduced expectations for Hispanic children and have placed many obstacles in their way. Nevertheless, Hispanics are maintaining their impressive tradition of fighting to improve the United States' educational system. Chapter 5 explores the roles of Hispanics in the professions, politics, business, and the arts, and Chapter 6 discusses the civil rights Hispanics still struggle to obtain. (Contains 56 references.) Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Civil Rights, Cubans, Dominicans

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. (1981). The H-2 Program and Nonimmigrants. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Immigration and Refugee Policy of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session. This document is a transcript of a hearing on provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act that govern the entry and the stay of certain classes of nonimmigrants, including temporary or H-2 workers and foreign students. The hearing also reviewed the proposal to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act so that visas could be waived for nationals of certain countries that have a reciprocal provision for visa waiver for citizens of the United States entering their countries. Finally, the hearing examined the most recent efforts of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in maintaining an adequate system for immigrant document control. Testimony and prepared statements were given by officials of the United States Department of Labor, Department of Agriculture, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service; by officials of various trade associations (such as the Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association and the American Pulpwood Association); and by migrant rights organizations. Those testifying assessed the provisions of the H-2 program on their groups' interests and offered some alternative amendments to the Act.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, Agricultural Laborers, Employment Projections, Farm Labor

Low, Victor (1982). The Unimpressible Race. A Century of Educational Struggle by the Chinese in San Francisco. This book traces the history of the Chinese experience in America, particularly in the San Francisco area, from the California Gold Rush era of the 1850s to the construction of a new all-Chinese school in San Francisco's Chinatown district in the 1950s. The first five chapters of the book detail the withholding of school privileges from both immigrant and native-born Chinese by city and California State school officials from the 1850s through the early 1920s. Chapter 6 describes the transitional years from 1922-40 when segregationist tactics began to break down, and chapter 7 describes the improved status of the Chinese resulting from their struggle against the Japanese during World War II, and their significant economic and social progress during the next two decades. A concluding chapter summarizes the impact of the civil rights movement of the 1960s and the 1974 Lau v. Nichols Supreme Court decision on educational gains by Chinese Americans through the early 1980s. Historical documentation as well as letters and a teacher questionnaire used by the author in his research are appended to the book. Descriptors: Acculturation, Bilingual Education, Chinese Americans, Civil Rights

Stiles, Richard L. (1990). ESL/Civics Integration: A Guide for Curriculum Development and Lesson Planning. This guide is designed to promote and assist in the integration of the civics curriculum, required for immigrant legalization, into the English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) curriculum through both curriculum development and program planning. The guide has two major parts. The first part is a listing, in a suggested sequence, of civics/ESL competencies appropriate to each of three language proficiency levels: beginning 1, beginning 2/3, and intermediate. The civics content is not limited to facts presented in the federal text, but includes information and activities enabling students to complete the legalization process, access services, exercise rights and responsibilities, and interact successfully with members of the larger community. The sequence of competencies is based on the degree of English fluency needed and the student's need to learn about personal and related civic processes, organizations, and events. Part two consists of sample lesson plans providing examples of a variety of instructional strategies in a sequenced lesson integrating language structures and civics content. Suggested instructional approaches for both the integrated ESL/civics content and the lesson plans are also outlined. (MSE)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Citizenship Education, Civics, Curriculum Development

Milne, Rosemary (1993). Bilingual Preschool Programs: Future Directions. Language policy in Australia has evolved in three phases, with three kinds of argumentation prevailing in public attitudes. In the first phase (1945 to the mid 1970s), maintenance of the first language by non-English-speaking-background (NESB) immigrants was considered a hindrance to assimilation and educational achievement, and thus abandonment of the first language was encouraged. In the second phase (beginning in the mid-1970s), first language maintenance came to be seen as a right, either for protection of cultural identity or for educational equity. Although this view remained controversial, Australia's first bilingual education programs were developed during this phase. In the third phase (late 1980s), bilingual education was seen as beneficial not only to NESB students but also to English-speaking-background (ESB) students, for whom knowledge of a second language was considered economically advantageous. For advocates of bilingual education, this argument has the drawback that it restricts the range of languages supported to those considered advantageous to ESB students. Recommended policy changes are: (1) wider enrollment of ESB students in bilingual programs (also, deliberate inclusion of "third language" students, which, along with first language maintenance, has been found to strengthen bilingual programs); (2) education of parents about bilingualism; (3) improvement of assessment within bilingual programs; (4) greater emphasis in policy justification on the benefits of bilingual education for Australian society as a whole.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Bilingual Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Cozic, Charles P., Ed. (1997). Welfare Reform. At Issue, An Opposing Viewpoints Series. Efforts to reform the welfare system in the United States have been gaining momentum since the late 1980s. Critics have been arguing that states should receive federal waivers to create their own programs to encourage welfare recipients to find work. The thrust of the 1996 welfare reform act transfers control over welfare spending to the states. Although selections in this anthology were written before the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, they present cogent arguments for and against measures in the Act and other proposed reforms of the welfare system. The following essays are included: (1) "Poor Women and Children Need Welfare" (Betty Reid Mandell); (2) "Welfare Reform Is a Mistake" (The Women's Alliance); (3) "Welfare Reform Violates Womens' Rights" (Mimi Abramovitz); (4) "Welfare Reform Must Protect Children and Legal Immigrants" (Bill Clinton); (5) "Welfare Reform Is Necessary" (Robert Rector); (6) "Welfare Reform Should Emphasize Family Unity" (Karl Zinsmeister); (7) "Welfare Reform Must Address the Crisis of Illegitimacy" (William J. Bennett); and (8) "Welfare Should Be Eliminated" (Michael Tanner). Eleven organizations are listed as resources to contact for further information. (Contains 1 table, 9 graphs, and 28 references.) Descriptors: Births to Single Women, Delivery Systems, Economically Disadvantaged, Employment Opportunities

Schwartz, Lita Linzer; Isser, Natalie (1983). The Role of Elementary Textbooks in a Multicultural Society. Given the assumption that children learn societal values in schools, textbooks and teaching manuals were reviewed to determine their effects on immigrant and minority-group children. The study was limited in three ways: (1) only primary through eighth-grade materials were reviewed; (2) only the immigration period (1880-1920), the post war period (1950-1972), and the current period (1973-1982) were included; and (3) emphasis was given to Chinese, Japanese, and Jews. An unequal number of textbooks and teaching manuals were evaluated for each time period. Reviewers considered which ethnic groups were named, the tone of the citations (negative, positive, stereotyped), and the accuracy of the content. It was found that between 1880 and 1920, the basic school policy was Americanization in which ethnic groups were given little consideration. Few changes took place until the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s when ethnic studies were encouraged, but mainly at the secondary level. Since 1973, teachers and textbook publishers have become more cognizant of ethnically balanced materials. Multicultural education is an accepted practice, but teachers need better education and guidelines.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Chinese Americans, Cultural Isolation, Cultural Pluralism

Perez-Erdelyi, Mireya (1986). Developing Cultural Sensitivity in Spanish for Special Purposes. In an effort to sensitize college students of Spanish for the professions to the values and social reality of the Hispanic world, one teacher used a combination of demographic information and Hispanic American literature. Information on the geographic distribution and characteristics of Hispanic groups in the United States was provided as a context for understanding the Hispanic experience, and writings by Hispanics who had seen a renaissance since the 1960s' civil rights struggle in the United States were used to supplement the demographic data. The literature contains the experiences, aspirations, and perspectives of immigrants and exiles to the United States, and poetry in particular was found to be a powerful sensitizing tool. Themes of the works include the migrant workers' experience, hopes placed in education for the children, the community, Hispanic heroes, social injustice, and the reasons for leaving the native countries. The emotional response and empathy of the students is seen as the most important tool for working effectively with Hispanic clients and patients. Descriptors: Cultural Awareness, Higher Education, Hispanic American Culture, Hispanic American Literature

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