Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 41 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include JULIAN SAMORA, Joseph Lo Bianco, Michael Sayler, Barbara Tomin, Carol Burgoa, Rosa Castro Feinberg, Gary Burnett, Charles P. Taft, Caroline Davis Gleiter, and Timothy Ready.

Feinberg, Rosa Castro (2002). Bilingual Education: A Reference Handbook. Contemporary Education Issues. This book describes the evolution of bilingual education in the United States, emphasizing its relationship to educational and civil rights reform. Federal, state, and district policies affecting the implementation of bilingual programs are identified, along with related legal, political, demographic, and economic factors and controversies. International comparisons of bilingual education programs illustrate additional types of language education and policies that incorporate diverse groups into mainstream society. Eight chapters include the following: (1) "Introduction: What Is Bilingual Education?" (e.g., English language instruction, indigenous students, and submersion); (2) "Chronology: The Evolution of Teacher Education"; (3) "Local Bilingual Education Policies and Curriculum" (e.g., characteristics of language minority students, funding, and two-way programs); (4) "State Policies and Bilingual Education" (e.g., state action in education, bridge programs, and state profiles); (5) "Bilingual Education and Federal Law" (e.g., federal authorization, federal incentives, and federal requirements or prohibitions); (6) "Politics and the Challenge of Linguistic Diversity" (e.g., immigration, school finance reform, and identity politics); (7) "Directory of Agencies and Organizations Associated with Bilingual Education"; and (8) "Print and Nonprint Resources" (annotated bibliographies). (Chapters contain references.) Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Civil Rights, Diversity (Student), Educational Finance

Sayler, Michael, Ed. (1996). Tempo, 1996, Tempo. This document consists of the four issues of "Tempo," the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (TAGT), published during 1996. Each issue focuses on a specific theme, such as math and science instruction, culturally diverse gifted students, parents and teachers working together, and future challenges. Articles include: "Science Education for Gifted Students" (Joyce VanTassel-Baska); "Young Math Whizzes: Can Their Needs Be Met in the Regular Classroom?" (Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik); "Nurturing Future Edisons: Teaching Invention to Gifted Students" (Jonathan Plucker and Michael E. Gorman); "Recruiting and Retaining Diverse Students in Gifted Education" (Donna Y. Ford and J. John Harris); "Hispanic and Gifted/Talented: Can You Be Both?" (Rebecca V. Rendon); "The Education of a Gifted Non-English Speaking Immigrant" (Becky Alanis); "Discovering and Nurturing Talents in Young Hispanic Students" (Marta Mountjoy); "Alternate Identification for Gifted African-Americans" (Donna Ashby); "Thinking about the September Challenge" (Donna Enersen), which discusses parents and teachers working together; "Advocating for Appropriate Education for Your Child" (Colleen Elam); "A Taste of Gifted and Talented for Parents" (Elma Torres); "Texas Law and Parent Rights and Responsibilities" (Ann Wink); "A Thoughtful Look at the Concept of Talent Development" (Francoys Gagne); "There and Back Again: Searching the Past for Future Answers" (Michael W. Cannon); "Magnet Programs for Gifted Girls: A Parent's Perspective" (Ava Welge and Beth Fouse); and "Home Schooling Gifted Children: The Ultimate Pullout Program" (Brooke Randal). Some articles include references.   [More]  Descriptors: Ability Identification, Black Students, Child Advocacy, Cultural Differences

Tomin, Barbara; Burgoa, Carol (1986). A Multi-Cultural Women's History Elementary Curriculum Unit. This curriculum unit for elementary students contains five short biographies of American women from different cultural groups. (1) Mary Shadd Cary–teacher, newspaper editor, and lawyer–was a free Black active as an abolitionist, a proponent of black migration to Canada before the Civil War, and a suffragist; (2) Frances Willard–teacher and the first American female college president–worked for prohibition and woman's suffrage and traveled the nation speaking about the need to start kindergartens, improve prisons, and strengthen child labor and worker protection laws; (3) Tye Leung Schulze–first Chinese-American woman voter and first Chinese-American federal civil servant–worked as an interpreter with newly arrived Chinese immigrants and helped young Chinese girls escape from conditions of slavery; (4) Felisa Rincon de Gautier–first female mayor of San Juan–worked throughout her life to improve the living conditions of poor Puerto Rican people; (5) Ada Deer–first woman chief of the Menominee tribe and now a university teacher and speaker for the American Indian women's leadership network, OHOYO–lobbied Congress to pass the Menominee Restoration Act, which reestablished tribal land and rights. Follow-up lessons for each section include defining and discussing vocabulary words, finding and using root words, reading comprehension, and discussion and writing activities. Closure projects include individual, small group, and whole class activities in math, art, creative writing, public speaking, history, and geography. The unit also contains teacher's answer sheets and descriptions of other curriculum resources developed by the National Women's History Project.   [More]  Descriptors: Biographies, Class Activities, Elementary Education, Females

SAMORA, JULIAN; AND OTHERS (1962). THE SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES. A PILOT STUDY TRACED THE HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES AND DISCUSSED THEIR PRESENT POSITION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY IN TERMS OF EDUCATION, HOUSING, EMPLOYMENT, ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE, VOTING, PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS, AND HEALTH. DISCRIMINATION AND THE DEPRIVATION OF CIVIL RIGHTS WERE EMPHASIZED. SOURCES FOR STUDY WERE BOOKS, ARTICLES, U.S. CENSUS REPORTS, CENSUS TRACT DATA, QUESTIONNAIRES, AND INTERVIEWS. ACCORDING TO THE 1960 CENSUS, 4,320,724 SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE LIVED IN THE UNITED STATES. OF THE TOTAL, 3,465,000 LIVED IN ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. IN THE 1950'S THEIR HISTORY WAS DIFFERENT FROM OTHER IMMIGRANT GROUPS, BECAUSE SPANISH AMERICANS AND PUERTO RICANS WERE CONQUERED PEOPLE UPON WHOM THE CULTURE OF THE CONQUERORS WAS SUPERIMPOSED. THEIR TRADITION OF PASSIVE SUBSERVIENCE TO AUTHORITY WAS THE BASIC DIFFICULTY IN THEIR ASSIMILATION TO AMERICAN SOCIETY. FACTORS COMPLICATING THE ASSIMILATION PROCESS WERE LANGUAGE DIFFICULTIES, SKIN COLOR, HEALTH DIFFERENCES, AND LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS. THEIR EDUCATION, HOUSING, EMPLOYMENT, HEALTH, INCOME, AND OCCUPATION CONDITIONS WERE POORER THAN OTHER NONWHITES AND MUCH POORER THAN THE WHITES. BASED ON THE FINDINGS IN THE STUDY, RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE FOR THE FOLLOWING–(1) A NATIONAL AGENCY TO HELP SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE SOLVE THEIR PROBLEMS, (2) MORE FIELD WORKERS FOR SPANISH SPEAKING LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS, (3) NONCOMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS AT THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS, (4) AN ATTACK ON THE MINORITY PROBLEM THROUGH PROGRAMS COMBATTING PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, AND EXPLOITATION, (5) MORE DETAILED RESEARCH STUDIES COVERING A LARGER NUMBER OF SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN EVERY ASPECT OF THEIR LIVES, AND (6) A CENTER FOR RESEARCH TO COORDINATE KNOWLEDGE AND PROGRAMS ON MINORITY GROUPS. Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Disadvantaged, Economically Disadvantaged, Mexican Americans

Burnett, Gary (1996). Enrollment Growth and Overcrowding in New York City Schools, IUME Briefs. As part of its work for the Citizens' Commission on Planning for Enrollment Growth, the Institute for Urban and Minority Education (IUME) conducted research to assess the impact of overcrowding on the students of New York City schools. All five of the City's boroughs have experienced recent enrollment growth that has been closely linked to changing demographics, including a significant increase in the immigrant population. Increases in enrollment have been compounded by a dramatic increase in the number of students enrolled in special education. These trends show no signs of changing, and it is likely that by the 2002-03 school year the City will have to accommodate one and a quarter million students. More carefully controlled research is necessary to identify the complex effects of overcrowding, but most sophisticated studies find a negative connection between increased class size and student achievement. The IUME used school board profile data, site visits to four overcrowded schools, and interviews with 599 students and 213 teachers to identify the negative effects of extreme overcrowding. A total of 62.6 percent of all students felt that their schools were overcrowded, and almost 50 percent felt that their classrooms were too crowded. The three most important concerns of teachers were student overcrowding; the need for adequate classroom space; and staff stress management related to overcrowding. Strategies for relieving overcrowding generally focus on finding new space or using time to use existing space more fully. Suggestions include leasing space, collaboratives, relocating administrative space, and district-wide redistribution of space. Regardless of the approach taken, students are entitled to adequate space for learning, as a student "Bill of Rights" should outline.   [More]  Descriptors: Class Size, Crowding, Educational Facilities, Elementary Secondary Education

Lainio, Jarmo (2002). European Linguistic Diversity–For Whom? The Cases of Finland and Sweden. Mercator Working Papers. Linguistic diversity in the Nordic countries has several dimensions. One main division is between what the majority group thinks it is about versus what the minority group thinks it is about. This paper examines the situation in Finland and Sweden, noting implications for linguistic diversity. Finland and Sweden contain five main varieties of Swedish and Finnish: majority Swedish; Swedish Finnish and Meankieli (two varieties of minority Finnish in Sweden); majority Finnish; and Finland Swedish in Finland. In both countries, linguistic diversity is in many respects about the legal right to receive instruction in the mother tongue. Sweden has promoted active bilingualism for all migrant students during the last 3 decades. This paper focuses on the following: Finland (Suomi); Sweden (Sverige); migration patterns in Finland and Sweden; language contact patterns in Finland and Sweden; and differentiated outcomes of linguistic diversity in Finland and Sweden. It notes that through the slowly improving status and prestige in Sweden of Swedish Finnish, there is greater willingness among both Finland Swedes and Finns in Finland to connect their language policies to that of Swedish in Finland. (Contains 41 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingualism, Elementary Secondary Education, Finnish, Foreign Countries

Gleiter, Caroline Davis; And Others (1980). The State of Civil Rights: 1979. The status of civil rights in housing, education, and employment is reviewed in this report. Among the conclusions are: (l) although 1979 court decisions helped to remedy discriminatory housing policies and practices, housing discrimination remains widespread throughout the United States, and decent housing for older persons, minorities, and female-headed households is still undelivered, (2) despite court decisions and legislation, equal educational opportunity is still an unrealized goal; and (3) although affirmative action programs have been increasingly used to improve employment opportunities for minorities and women, and although various laws prohibit discrimination in employment, unemployment levels for minorities and women remain intolerably high. Additional civil rights issues discussed include voting rights, police practices, and immigration.   [More]  Descriptors: Affirmative Action, Civil Rights, Civil Rights Legislation, Educational Discrimination

Ready, Timothy, Ed.; Edley, Christopher, Jr., Ed.; Snow, Catherine E., Ed. (2002). Achieving High Educational Standards for All: Conference Summary. This book presents proceedings and papers from a conference on racial and ethnic disparities in K-12 education and identifies key issues for policy and research. Part 1 summarizes the conference in six chapters: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Education and the Changing Nation"; (3) "How People Learn"; (4) "Social Dimensions of Learning"; (5) "Policy and the Education of Minority and Disadvantaged Students"; and (6) "Linking Research and Practice." Part 2 presents the perspectives of the co-moderators: "Overview" (Catherine E. Snow) and "Education Reform in Context: Research, Politics, and Civil Rights" (Christopher Edley, Jr.). Part 3 presents the three conference papers: "Trends in the Educational Achievement of Minority Students since Brown v. Board of Education" (Kim M. Lloyd, Marta Tienda, and Anna Zajacova); "Why Racial Integration and Other Policies since Brown v. Board of Education Have Only Partially Succeeded at Narrowing the Achievement Gap" (Ronald E. Ferguson and Jal Mehta); and "Education Adequacy, Democracy, and the Courts" (Michael A. Rebell). The conference and workshop agendas and biographical sketches of conference presenters are appended. (Papers contain references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academic Standards, Cognitive Style, Democracy

Taft, Charles P.; Felknor, Bruce L. (1960). Prejudice and Politics. This monograph, written in 1960, examines the part prejudice played in politics throughout our national history. Part I of the monograph discusses "The Colonial Era." The immigrants that populated the new nation brought with them varied cultural heritages and different religious faiths. Soon the colonial pattern of religious prejudice reflected the bias prevalent in mother England. Catholics were severely disqualified in almost every colony. Jews received rights in some places and were debarred in others. The period from "The Revolution to the Civil War" was examined in Part II. The first organized effort to rally religious prejudice in an election campaign occurred in 1800 when the Federalists published a pamphlet addressed to "Religious Republicans" which suggested that Jefferson was anti-religious. During this time two anti-Catholic groups–the Native American Party and the Know-Nothings became quite active. Part III examines the "Civil War to World War I." In the Presidential campaign of 1860, Lincoln was subject to some of the worst vilification that has ever been heaped on any American politician. The Ku Klux Klan was formed in 1866. The next religious group to come under the guns of intolerance was the Mormons. "World War I to the Rise of Hitler" is the topic of Part IV. The World War effectively halted immigration to the United States, and never was it resumed on a pre-war scale. The crudest form of anti-Catholic bigotry played a major part against Smith in the 1928 Presidential campaign. The period from "The Rise of Hitler to the President" is examined in Part V. After 1930 the pattern of anti-Semitism in the United States changed. After Hitler came to power, the United States denounced his action toward the Jews with conviction. Bigotry continued to appear in politics. One example is the anti-Catholic campaign against Kennedy in 1960. Descriptors: Bias, Catholics, Civil Rights, Elections

Lo Bianco, Joseph (2000). After the Tsunami, Some Dilemmas: Japanese Language Studies in Multicultural Australia. Language Australia Research Policy and Practice Papers. This paper describes responses to linguistic pluralism in Australian policy in relation to Australia's Asian language context, and the teaching and learning of Japanese within these two frameworks. Finally, the paper considers some ideas relating intercultural language learning to all second language study termed: the Third Place. There are three approaches typically taken toward multilingualism in a given society, looking at multilingualism as a problem, a right, or a resource. Australia viewed multilingualism as a problem through the middle of the 1970s. This eventually led to a contestation of that approach, which culminated in the language as a right movement, which gained considerable ground in the later 1970s and through the 1980s. By the 1990s, the language a resource school began to gain influence. Regarding multilingualism as a resource involves construing the diversity of languages within the community as a public as well as an individual benefit and fashioning public policies accordingly. All of Australia's languages are reviewed, including a review of the role of Japanese language studies in Australian education and Japanese studies. Cultures, general knowledge, and intercultural language teaching are also discussed. (Contains 18 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Australian Aboriginal Languages, Cultural Pluralism, Elementary Secondary Education, Foreign Countries

Stepick, Alex (1981). Structural Determinants of the Haitian Refugee Movement: Different Interpretations. Occasional Papers Series, Dialogues #4. By borrowing and adapting theoretical frameworks from the structural approach to migration and the dialectical view of legal repression, this paper attempts to explain why Haitian boat people in south Florida have been so singularly persecuted and, secondly, why the government's efforts to expel the Haitians have failed. First, the study's structural approach is developed: within this framework, the Haitian population's movements are seen as fundamentally determined by economic cycles and their fate is tied to their mode of incorporation into the receiving economy. Because the boat people possess neither the human nor financial capital to create an enclave or become integrated into the primary sector, their only alternative is south Florida's relatively underdeveloped secondary labor market. The paper also analyzes the particular "push" factors in Haiti which have encouraged massive emigration, and the "pull" factors in south Florida. The latter are seen as minimal, and the relative absence of opportunities in the receiving area is said to have produced tension at the local and national levels. Locally, it is argued, anti-Haitian political authorities view the boat people as a disruptive force which destroys the community and drains public resources, while the Immigration and Naturalization Service fears that admitting Haitian refugees would set a precedent by "opening the floodgates" to immigrants from other authoritarian regimes. The paper then examines the roles played by the courts and other advocates for the rights of the Haitians (including government and church groups). The remainder of the paper presents an overview of efforts to formulate policy and legislation in response to the growing influx of Haitians to the United States in the late 1970s. A conclusion characterizes government's responses to this issue as contradictory and inconsistent.   [More]  Descriptors: Federal Government, Government Role, Haitians, Immigrants

Johnson, Edward C. (1975). Walker River Paiutes: A Tribal History. The Northern Paiute people of Nevada's Walker Lake area were known as the Agai Diccutta (Trout Eaters); they called themselves the Numa, or the People. For as long as anyone could recall, they had lived in the area, catching the huge trout from the lake and harvesting the pinon nuts and other foods from the surrounding desert. In the 1820's the first contacts were made with the white intruders, and when gold was discovered in California in 1848, a large wave of white immigrants struck. Food and hunting sources were destroyed; the people were attacked by the intruders and the diseases they brought with them. By 1859 two reservations were set aside, one at Pyramid Lake and the other at Walker; but, within ten years the Nevada legislature was pushing Congress to open up this land to whites. The People tried to live peacefully on the reservation, but their attempts at farming were thwarted as white farmers diverted the irrigation water supplies. The Ghost Dances of 1870 and 1890 reflected the Indians' despair as they sought to implore God and the Dead to return and dispel the intruders. Efforts by whites continued to reduce or abolish the reservation, and finally in 1906 the People lost most of their reservation lands. By 1909 government policy sought the destruction of the People's culture. This history of the Walker Lake Paiute, told from their point of view, continues to 1974 as it documents the People's struggles to regain lost lands, retain their culture, and establish the rights so long denied them. Descriptors: Agricultural Production, American Indian Culture, American Indian Reservations, American Indians

American Journalism Historians' Association. (1995). Selected Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Journalism Historians Association (Tulsa, Oklahoma, September 28-30, 1995). Part II. The 14 papers in this collection all deal with 20th century journalism and journalists in the United States. The papers and their authors are: "Educating Ike: The Evolution of Presidential PR in 1953" (David W. Guth); "Crumbs from the Publishers' Golden Tables: The Plight of the Chicago Newsboy" (Jon Bekken); "'They Work Too Hard': How Newspapers Justified the 1924 Exclusion of Japanese Immigrants" (Brad Hamm); "Agnes Smedley: A Radical Journalist in Search of a Cause" (Karla Gower); "The Camera's Red Lens: Television Coverage of Wounded Knee II, 1973" (William Hewitt); "From College Expulsion to Pulitzer Prize: How the New York World-Telegram's Fred Woltman Became the 'No. 1 Newspaper Specialist' on Communists" (Brad Hamm); "The Segregationist Press in the Closed Society: The Jackson Daily News' Coverage of the Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1964" (David R. Davies); "A 'Political Institutional' Theory of the News: The Emergence of Independent Journalism in Detroit, 1865-1920" (Richard L. Kaplan); "Will Irwin Revisited: A Contrast of Past and Present Criticisms of the Press" (Brian C. Smith); "Returning Government to the Hands of the People: The Pacific Northwest's Nonpartisan League Newspapers" (Mary M. Cronin and Paul Schlienz); "Birth Control Crusade: The Public Relations Campaign" (R. Brooks Garner); "AIDS and the Gay Press: Uncovering or Covering Up?" (Rodger Streitmatter); "The Farmer and the Radio Man Should Be Friends: Clear Channel Radio Stations and the Farm Lobby, 1941-1968" (James C. Foust); and "Electrical Transcriptions: Quality Programming for All Radio Stations" (Jann Hyde).   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Rights, Journalism, Journalism History, Journalism Research

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (1996). The Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher, 1996. Students Voice Their Opinions On: Learning about Multiculturalism. Part IV. This report, the last in a series of four 1996 releases of students' opinions, represents a continued effort by MetLife to provide insight and understanding to current issues of education in American public schools. The survey assessed student opinions and interests in learning about multicultural topics. Public school students from middle and high schools nationwide, grades seven through twelve, responded to questions on the availability of multicultural courses, their interest in taking these courses, their opinions about the emphasis their school places on this subject and their evaluations of teachers' lessons on tolerance.  Reported findings include: (1) Most students say their school offers classes on multiculturalism; (2) Students are divided in their opinions on whether their school is placing the right amount of emphasis on teaching multiculturalism; (3) Student interest in learning more about the holidays and other special events that people in different parts of the world celebrate was assessed: most are either very or somewhat interested in this topic; (4) Less than half of students nationwide (44%) think their teachers do an average job of helping them to be tolerant of others; (5) A slight majority of students say their school does a satisfactory job of helping immigrant students learn or improve their English; and (6) Students are divided on whether or not the teachers in their school mirror the social and ethnic makeup of the students. Four appendices are included: (1) Cleaning Data for the Report; (2) Methodology; (3) Harris Scholastic Sample Design Methodology; and (4) Questionnaire. (Contains 25 tables.) [This report is one of a 4-part series. For Part I, see ED504813. For Part II, see ED504814. For Part III, see ED504815.]   [More]  Descriptors: Student Attitudes, Student Interests, Cultural Pluralism, Research Reports

Everhart, Robert B., Ed. (1982). The Public School Monopoly: A Critical Analysis of Education and the State in American Society. The following 14 essays consider relationships among schooling, education, and the state; alternatives to existing systems; and educating minorities and the disadvantaged: (1) "Growing Up Blighted: Reflections on the 'Secret Power' in the American Experience" (C. Burgess); (2) "The Evolving Political Structure of American Schooling" (J. Spring); (3) "Nineteenth-Century Opponents of State Education: Prophets of Modern Revisionism" (G. H. Smith); (4) "Schooling for Work and Working at School: Perspectives on Immigrant and Working-Class Education in Urban America, 1880-1920" (C. H. Edson); (5) "Critical Literacy: A Conception of Education as a Moral Right and a Social Ideal" (M. S. Katz); (6) "The Manipulation of Consciousness: A First Amendment Critique of Schooling" (S. Arons and C. Lawrence III); (7) "A Comparative and International Perspective on the Prospects for Family and Community Control of Schooling" (T. J. La Belle); (8) "Changing Political Patterns and Governmental Regulations" (L. Iannaccone); (9) "Institutional Parameters and the Purposes of Schooling: State Regulation of Educational Innovation" (R. B. Everhart); (10) "The Prospects for Education Vouchers: An Economic Analysis" (E. G. West); (11) "Disturbing Evidence about the One Best System" (D. A. Erickson); (12) "The Impact of Taxation Policy on Public and Private Schools" (T. W. Vitullo-Martin); (13) "Educational Tax Credits" (R. A. Freeman); and (14) "Education and Cultural Reproduction: A Critical Reassessment of Programs for Choice" (M. W. Apple). A conclusion by R. B. Everhart summarizes the relationships between education and the state. Descriptors: Community Control, Economically Disadvantaged, Educational Change, Educational Legislation

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