Bibliography: Immigrant Rights (page 47 of 54)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Sanctuary Cities website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Philadelphia American Friends Service Committee, Gloria Zyskowski, Donald F. Uerling, Cheryl T. Desmond, Edinburgh (Scotland). Centre for Educational Sociology. Economic and Social Research Council, Doris M. Meissner, Jean Stefancic, Urmila Mohapatra, Roger Wilson, and Richard Delgado.

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees. First Edition. This guidebook provides refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. Available in several languages, the book is distributed to overseas processing agencies and refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission. It is also distributed to service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they enter the country, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and for adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Desmond, Cheryl T. (1993). German Language and Education in Pennsylvania, 1683-1911: Cultural Resistance and State Accommodation. This research investigated the nature of the language and educational experiences of the Germans who emigrated to the province and later, to the state of Pennsylvania. German migration into Pennsylvania began in 1683, peaked during the years 1717 through 1754, and continued throughout the nineteenth century. The research indicated that both official and unofficial colonial and state attempts were made to Anglicize the Germans through the use of the English language in schooling for the Germans. The Germans, nonetheless, strongly resisted these efforts to displace their "Muttersprach" through private schooling, political participation in local and state affairs, and through public support of substantial German language instruction in the common schools until the advent of World War I. These findings call into question research that concluded that an American tradition of bilingual education consisted strictly of local experiments in large, urban Midwestern and Southwestern schools and supports scholarship that has maintained that the United States granted language rights to its earliest minorities.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Culture Conflict, Diachronic Linguistics, English

Uerling, Donald F. (1982). The Supreme Court and Educational Policy: The Protected Interests in Education. The nature of the interests in education that are protected by the Constitution may be ascertained by reference to certain due process and equal protection decisions of the Supreme Court reviewed in this paper. Although education is not a right granted by the Constitution, the Court has often recognized the importance of education, both to the individual and to the society. It seems that in terms of constitutional protections the Court has now accorded a sort of favored legal status to education although the exact nature of this status is unclear. The basic education necessary for functional literacy may be the extent of the protected interest. Although how this level of education is to be defined or measured is uncertain, what does seem clear is that the Constitution protects the individual against inequitable and unfair state action. Whatever educational opportunities the state does choose to provide, neither a discrete class nor a single individual may be unfairly excluded from access to those opportunities. Although the Fourteenth Amendment does not extend to every person the guarantee of success, the concepts of due process and equal protection do shield each person from state-imposed failure.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Constitutional Law, Due Process, Educational Discrimination

American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, PA. (1983). Seeking Safe Haven: A Congregational Guide to Helping Central American Refugees in the United States. Over the last three years, religious groups and communities around the United States have become increasingly aware of the arrival in this country of large numbers of Salvadorans and Guatemalans seeking refuge from violence and persecution but instead facing arrest and deportation as illegal aliens. This guide is an attempt to mobilize, orient, and support congregational involvement with the people and the issues. It offers the options both to respond to the immediate human needs of the refugees and to examine and respond to the larger issues provoking their flight and the denial of haven to them in the United States. The guide is divided into eight sections. The three initial sections provide overviews and background information on the refugee-producing situations and the conditions faced by the refugees, in particular in this country. The fourth section is a summary of the options for action, from the quick and simple to the more complex. Suggestions are provided for individual responses and for congregational actions. The fifth section provides the detailed "how to" guidelines for each of the suggested options. The sixth lists social and legal services available to Central American refugees arriving in the United States. The seventh part is a summary of the legal rights of Central American refugees. The final parts comprise a compendium of resource listings and information briefs. Descriptors: Church Role, Due Process, Humanitarianism, Information Sources

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Dobro Dosli U Sjedinjene Drzave. Prirucnik za Izbjeglice. (Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees). This guidebook provides Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Delgado, Richard, Ed.; Stefancic, Jean, Ed. (1998). The Latino/a Condition. A Critical Reader. This collection explores the struggles of the varied Latino peoples for identity, recognition, and legitimacy in the United States. Issues such as what it means to be Latino/a, what a just immigration policy should be, relations between Latinos and other cultural groups, and whether being Latino is a race or an ethnicity are explored. The 94 chapters of the collection are grouped into the following sections: (1) "The Shape of the Latino Group: Who Are We and What Are We Talking about Anyway?"; (2) "Conquest and Immigration: How We Got (Get) Here"; (3) "Nativism, Racism, and Our Social Construction as a 'Problem' Group: How Once We Were Here, We Were Racialized by the Dominant Culture"; (4) "Racial Construction and Demonization in Mass Culture: Media Treatment and Stereotypes"; (5) "Counterstories: We Begin To Talk Back and 'Name Our Own Reality'"; (6) "Rebellious Lawyering and Resistance Strategies: We Fight Back"; (7) "Revisionist Law: Does the Legal System Work for Us?"; (8) "Assimiliationism: Maybe Our Best Strategy Is Just To Duck?"; (9) "Splits and Tensions within the Civil Rights Community"; (10) "Sex, Gender, and Class: Sure I'm a Latino, but I'm Still Different from You–How about It?"; (11) "English-Only, Bilingualism, Interpreters: You Mean I Can't Speak Spanish?"; and (12) "The Border as Metaphor: What Border Theory Tells Us about Culture." (Contains numerous references.) Descriptors: Cultural Awareness, Essays, Ethnicity, Hispanic Americans

Wilson, Roger (1988). States and Civil Rights: Is the American Dream Still Deferred?, Journal of State Government. States must ensure that all citizens, regardless of race, have real opportunities to gain the education and skills needed to achieve the American Dream. If state policies, especially economic policies, fail to acknowledge the growing numbers of poor Black undereducated and unskilled urban youth, that dream of equal opportunity will continue to be deferred. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Access to Education, Affirmative Action, Black Employment

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Bienvenue aus Etats-Unis. Guide Pour Refugies. (Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees). This guidebook provides French-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees (Arabic Version). This guidebook provides Arabic-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Arabic, Civil Rights

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Ku Soo Dhawaada Dalka Mareykanka. Buugga tusmadda Qaxootiga. (Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees). This guidebook provides Somali-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Mohapatra, Urmila (1996). Asian Indian Culture in America: A Bibliography of Research Documents. A Research Report. This bibliography has been prepared as a research tool for scholars who want to conduct studies about Asian Indian Americans. Only a few published works on Asian Indian Americans are available in book length; most are journal articles, monographs, research reports, dissertations and theses, newspaper articles, and unpublished manuscripts. Works cited are grouped into 35 chapters (following a preface and introduction) that cover the following topics: (1) overviews of the Asian Indian population; (2) theoretical perspectives; (3) history of immigration, immigration patterns, and population profiles; (4) literary writings (poetry, fiction, short stories, juvenile literature, and essays) by Asian Indian Americans; (5) social life and customs; (6) teaching and studying about Asian Indian Americans; (7) political attitudes and behavior; (8) family environment; (9) community and legal environments; (10) health perspectives; (11) employment and economic status; (12) Asian Indian American professionals and businesses; (13) Asian Indian American students; (14) civil rights and discrimination; (15) interviews and surveys; (16) cultural assimilation and religiosity; (17) issues of children, women, and the elderly; (18) consumer and investment behavior; (19) biographies and travelogues; (20) community directories; (21) magazines and newspapers; (22) videos, movies, and musical productions; and (23) bibliographies on Asian Indian Americans. Contains 762 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Asian Americans, Behavior Patterns, Civil Rights

Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center. (1996). Han Hoan Chao Ban Den Hoa Ky. Sach Chi Dan Danh Cho Nguoi Ti Nan. (Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees). This guidebook provides Vietnamese-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the American educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the American tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included. Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Economic and Social Research Council, Edinburgh (Scotland). Centre for Educational Sociology. (1996). Bienvenido a los Estados Unidos. Una Guia para Refugiados (Welcome to the United States. A Guide for Refugees). First Edition. This guidebook provides Spanish-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. This is the Spanish version, and is available in several other languages. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service providers. Refugees are advised that most Americans value self-reliance and individual responsibility, but that in general people respect those who ask questions about the new culture they are entering. All refugees are assigned to a relocation agency as they arrive in the United States, and housing is made available for the first month. The following topics are addressed: (1) pre-arrival processing; (2) the role of the resettlement agency; (3) community services; (4) housing; (5) transportation; (6) employment; (7) education; (8) health; (9) managing your money; (10) rights and responsibilities of refugees; and (11) cultural adjustment. Among the topics discussed is that of the U.S. educational system, both for children and adults. A general outline of the public school system includes a discussion of the U.S. tradition of public participation in education. A map of the United States is included. Descriptors: Acculturation, Adult Education, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness

Zyskowski, Gloria; Rincones, Rodolfo (1990). One Approach to a Formal Evaluation of the Amnesty Program. In November 1986, the United States Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which, in part, mandated a program granting legal status to certain undocumented residents who had been in the country since before January 1, 1982. The program involves a two-step process by which currently undocumented aliens are granted temporary and, then, permanent citizenship status. This paper describes a means of providing formal evaluation of the educational program–associated with the amnesty effort conducted by the Dallas (Texas) Independent School District (DISD)–designed to inform potential amnesty applicants of their rights and responsibilities. The DISD was involved in planning the provision of English language and civics classes to approximately 60,000 amnesty applicants believed to reside in Dallas/Rockwall County. During the first year of amnesty classes, the DISD enrolled about 15,000 amnesty applicants in classes at over 100 sites in the 2-county area. The evaluation effort included interviews with program directors, administrator and teacher surveys, student interviews, and classroom observation in 17 classrooms. Results provide information on the accessibility and availability of programming, staff development, site personnel cooperation, teacher preparedness, teaching methods, and student evaluation of program effectiveness. Two data tables are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Civics, Classroom Observation Techniques, Educational Assessment

Meissner, Doris M. (1981). A Legalization Program for Illegal Aliens Living in the United States. Statement before the Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law, House of Representatives. A legalization program for illegal aliens living in the United States is examined in this statement by Doris Meissner, Acting Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Meissner states that the Administration's current proposed legislation is designed to regain control of the immigration process through the development of more effective enforcement measures. This legislation is said to be based on the rationale that: (1) qualified aliens would be able to contribute more to society if they were granted the right to open participation; (2) the enactment of employers sanctions legislation would curtail further uncontrolled hiring of illegal aliens; and (3) legalization would enable the INS to target its enforcement resources on new flows of illegal aliens and avoid devoting limited investigative resources equity claims by aliens. Meissner explains that the current bill would provide "temporary residence status" to illegal aliens who entered the United States prior to January 1, 1980 and have had a continuous residence since that time. Meissner says that the Administration supports a one time legalization program but does not believe that the process of legalization should begin until new enforcement measures, such as employers sanctions have been instituted.   [More]  Descriptors: Eligibility, Federal Legislation, Illegal Immigrants, Immigration Inspectors

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